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Anti-Doping FAQs

To complete the anti-doping information already available on the FAI website, the FAI has created two FAQs for competitors and event organisers (see below) to facilitate a better knowledge and understanding of all matters relating to anti-doping.

A PDF version of the two FAQs is also available to download (see below).

FAQ for Event Organisers

  1. I am organizing an event this year in my country. What should I do?
  2. If doping tests are conducted at my event, what should I do?
  3. If a competitor usually takes substances and is tested at my event, what do I risk?
  4. How long before the results of the doping test(s) conducted at my event are known? Immediately?
  5. What if I accept an athlete who is suspended?
  6. Who pays for doping tests conducted at my event?
  7. If a competitor refuses a doping test, should I interfere?
  8. If a competitor admits to me to have taken a substance from the Prohibited List, who should I address him/her to?
  9. More info?

PDF VERSION

1. I am organizing an event this year in my country. What should I do?

Unless you wish to organize doping tests on your own initiative, you do not need to do anything. The FAI will contact you if required.
However, you should inform competitors about their need to have a valid TUE (Therapeutic Use Exemption) in case they are taking a medication which includes substances on the WADA list of prohibited substances. This document is needed if the competitors are tested in competition to avoid a sanctions in the event of a positive test.

More: www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/therapeutic-use-exemptions

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2. If doping tests are conducted at my event, what should I do?

If a Doping Control Officer comes to your event, s/he will officially introduce him/herself and request a clean toilet to conduct the test. S/he will also need a separate private room with a table and chairs where s/he will be able to talk with the competitor.
You do not need to do anything else other than providing the toilets and the separate room.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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3. If a competitor usually takes substances and is tested at my event, what do I risk?

You do not risk anything. The competitor will risk the sanction, not you. There is no risk that the event will be cancelled or postponed.

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4. How long before the results of the doping test(s) conducted at my event are known? Immediately?

No, it will take a few weeks for results management to be conducted. This means that your competition does not risk anything if a competitor has doped.

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5. What if I accept an athlete who is suspended?

It is not your responsibility to check whether an athlete has been suspended for doping but you are required to check whether s/he holds a valid sporting licence before entering your competition. His/her NAC should have withdrawn his/her sporting licence in case s/he is suspended.
But you can of course check the Anti-Doping section on the FAI website where sanctions are published for the duration of the suspension.

More:http://www.fai.org/cimp-projects/cimp-fai-anti-doping-programme

More:http://www.fai.org/about-fai/fai-sporting-licences  

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6. Who pays for doping tests conducted at my event?

Until further notice, doping tests are financed and organized by the FAI or by the authority ordering the tests (National Anti-Doping organization, WADA, etc).
But you are entirely free to organize and pay for tests, should you wish to show that yours is a “clean” event.
Should you need any additional information or help to organize tests, please contact the FAI Anti-Doping Manager (antidoping[at]fai.org).

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7. If a competitor refuses a doping test, should I interfere?

It is not your role to interfere during a doping control. You can of course try to talk with the athlete but this is the main task of the Doping Control Officer and also of the athlete’s team / coach / entourage, etc.
As the holder of an FAI Sporting Licence, an athlete agrees to comply with the FAI Rules and therefore to comply with anti-doping measures.

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8. If a competitor admits to me to have taken a substance from the Prohibited List, who should I address him/her to?

It would be good to address him/her to the FAI Anti-Doping Manager (antidoping[at]fai.org) who will then follow-up on the situation and the next steps to take.

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9. More info?

FAI Anti-Doping Manager : Mrs. Ségolène ROUILLON
+41 21 345 10 70 / This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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FAQ for Competitors

  1. Who or what is WADA?
  2. I am practicing my sport as a hobby. Why is anti-doping related to my sport?
  3. There are no performance enhancing drugs in my sport. Why does the FAI follow what WADA is dictating?
  4. What do I risk by taking prohibited substances?
  5. What if I occasionally use social drugs?
  6. I am competing at international level and I take medication for a specific medical treatment. What should I do ?
  7. If I am tested, will it be blood or urine sample?
  8. If I am tested, who conducts the test?
  9. Soon I will participate in an FAI event such as a World Championship. Might I be tested?
  10. If I am tested, what should I do?
  11. If I am tested, what is done with my samples?
  12. If I am tested, can I trust the Doping Control Officer?
  13. If I am tested and my sample is positive, what can I do?
  14. How do I know if I am taking something on the Prohibited List?
  15. May I drink alcohol during competition?
  16. What is ADAMS?
  17. What is a TUE?
  18. What is an RTP and what are Whereabouts?
  19. Can I be tested out of competition? Can someone ring at my door early in the morning?
  20. Who should I first contact if I have a question?
  21. More info?

PDF VERSION

 

1. Who or what is WADA?

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is an independent foundation created through a collective initiative led by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). It was set up on November 10, 1999 to promote, coordinate and monitor the fight against drugs in sport. WADA is responsible for the World Anti-Doping Code, adopted by more than 600 sports organizations, including international sports federations, national anti-doping organizations, the IOC, and the International Paralympic Committee.
The FAI has been signatory of the World Anti-Doping Code since 2003.

More: www.wada-ama.org

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2. I am practicing my sport as a hobby. Why is anti-doping related to my sport?

Anti-Doping programmes seek to preserve what is intrinsically valuable about sport – fair-play and integrity. Following the adoption in 2003 by the FAI General Conference of the World Anti-Doping Code, the FAI is committed to a programme of anti-doping. The FAI Anti-Doping Rules and Procedures are designed to implement FAI's responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code. They reflect FAI's determination to ensure that there is no doping in air sports. By applying for an FAI Sporting Licence, athletes accept these rules as a condition of participation in air sports.

More:http://www.fai.org/cimp-projects/cimp-fai-anti-doping-programme

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3. There are no performance enhancing drugs in my sport. Why does the FAI follow what WADA is dictating?

The FAI wants to ensure a fair and level playing field. Also, as an Olympic recognized federation, the FAI has to observe the WADA Code and be compliant. Not doing this would result in losing this recognition and as a consequence, many FAI Members would also lose their national recognition and support from their governments or National Olympic Committees. Besides, this would prevent us from participating in multisport events such as IWGA The World Games, for example.

More:http://www.fai.org/cimp-projects/cimp-fai-anti-doping-programme

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4. What do I risk by taking prohibited substances?

The activities, defined as "doping", are contrary to the FAI's principles of fair play, and are potentially damaging to athletes' health and safety. Therefore, you risk:
-    A sanction, such as a suspension to compete for a certain number of years
-    Damaging your health

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/rules-and-procedures

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5. What if I occasionally use social drugs?

Occasional social drug use is at your own risk. But you should be aware that not only might they be considered as a prohibited substance and be detected at a doping control but more importantly they are not acceptable in aviation as they might put yourself and others in danger.

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6. I am competing at international level and I take medication for a specific medical treatment. What should I do ?

Go and see your doctor and check whether the medication that he/she is prescribing is on the WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Methods. If yes, apply for a TUE (see link below). Get the certificate (usually one or two weeks after application) and bring it with you to competitions.

Please note that you should check the nature of the substance and get a TUE as soon as you get a medication prescribed and not only at the occasion of a competition.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/therapeutic-use-exemptions

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/tue_at_a_glance

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7. If I am tested, will it be blood or urine sample?

The FAI orders only urine doping tests. But should you be tested under the mandate of another organization like your NADO (National Anti-Doping organization), it can be possible to undergo a blood test.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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8. If I am tested, who conducts the test?

The person who is officially responsible and will test you is called a Doping Control Officer (DCO). He/she is working for a sample collection agency on behalf of the FAI. You can ask to see his/her authorization letter upon arrival as well as his/her ID card if you wish. This person does not work directly for and is not directly part of the FAI.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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9. Soon I will participate in an FAI event such as a World Championship. Might I be tested?

Yes you might be tested. All athletes competing at FAI Events are subject at any time during the competition to in-competition testing ordered by the FAI or by the athlete's NAC or by any other Anti-Doping Organization responsible for testing at a competition or event in which they participate.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

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10. If I am tested, what should I do?

A Doping Control Officer (DCO) will come to you and ask you to give a urine sample. You can be chaperoned (accompanied) by one person if you wish. The DCO will ask you to fill in the official papers and provide the samples in the toilets.
Should you be under medication and benefit from a TUE, please mention it.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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11. If I am tested, what is done with my samples?

Your samples will be sealed in your presence and sent to a WADA accredited laboratory in strict confidence and will be tracked to ensure their security.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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12. If I am tested, can I trust the Doping Control Officer?

The Doping Control Officer is officially mandated for this mission and you can fully trust him/her.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

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13. If I am tested and my sample is positive, what can I do?

During the sample collection, you will give two samples : A and B. Usually, only A sample is examined. If you are tested positive (called Adverse Analytical Finding – AAF), you have the right to ask for the B sample to be examined if you wish to be sure whether there was a mistake or not.
If it is confirmed that your sample is positive, the results will all go to the FAI Anti-Doping Manager who will set up an Doping Review Panel and study your case. You will be informed of all the steps being followed.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/anti-doping-testing

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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14. How do I know if I am taking something on the Prohibited List?

Prohibited substances are often included in medication. Therefore, should you take any medication for medical reasons, please go and ask your doctor to check whether the medication is on the Prohibited List published by WADA.
Be careful that dietary and nutritional supplements can also include prohibited substances. Be careful and ask your doctor for advice about these also.

More:http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Resources/Q-and-A/2013-Prohibited-List/

More:http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Resources/Q-and-A/Dietary-and-Nutritional-Supplements/

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/doping_control_process_at_a_glance

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15. May I drink alcohol during competition?

Alcohol in air sports is prohibited in competition for obvious civil aviation legal and safety reasons. This means that you could be tested positive if you are tested during a competition. Units of alcohol are an inexact guide because the definition varies between countries. However, in many countries there is a legal limit of 0.50g/l for driving motor vehicles. Sound practical advice is to stay strictly within this driving limit during the evening prior to any competitive air sport event and within legal limits as defined by civil aviation authorities during your flying activities. This will provide an assurance that the WADA limit will not be breached if you are tested the following morning.
But be careful that alcohol is dangerous for your health in general.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/alcohol-and-air-sports-contests

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16. What is ADAMS?

Under the World Anti-Doping Code (the document harmonizing anti-doping rules in all sports), WADA has an obligation to coordinate anti-doping activities and to provide a mechanism to assist stakeholders with their implementation of the Code. The Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS) was developed for this purpose. It is a Web-based database management system that simplifies the daily activities of all stakeholders and athletes involved in the anti-doping system—from athletes providing whereabouts information, to anti-doping organizations ordering tests, to laboratories reporting results, to anti-doping organizations managing results. It is easy to use, secure, compliant with data privacy rules, available in several languages, and free to WADA’s stakeholders, increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the fight against doping in sport.

More:http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Resources/Q-and-A/ADAMS/

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17. What is a TUE?

Athletes, like anyone, may have illnesses or conditions that require them to take particular medications. If the medication an athlete is required to take to treat an illness or condition happens to be on the Prohibited List, a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) may give that athlete the authorization to take the needed medicine.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/therapeutic-use-exemptions

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/tue_at_a_glance

More:http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Resources/Q-and-A/Therapeutic-Use-Exemption-TUE/

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18. What is an RTP and what are Whereabouts?

RTP means “Registered testing pool” and defines a group of athletes selected to be in this pool and subject to out-of-competition testing. Whereabouts is information provided by a limited number of top elite athletes included in the RTP about their location to the FAI or National Anti-Doping Organization (NADO) that included them in their respective registered testing pool as part of these top elite athletes’ anti-doping responsibilities.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/registered-testing-pool

More:http://www.fai.org/downloads/cimp/whereabouts_at_a_glance

More:http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Resources/Q-and-A/Whereabouts/

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19. Can I be tested out of competition? Can someone ring at my door early in the morning?

If you are part of the FAI Registered Testing Pool (RTP) and only if you are part of this pool, then you will have provided your whereabouts and may be tested out-of-competition which means that it can be early in the morning (but only from 6:00 am onwards) at your home or later on at your training place, and so on.

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/registered-testing-pool

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20. Who should I first contact if I have a question?

You can of course contact your club or your NAC (FAI Member in your country) but as they might not have exhaustive knowledge about anti-doping matters, we advise you to contact the FAI Anti-Doping Manager anytime you have a question (antidoping[at]fai.org).

More:http://www.fai.org/anti-doping-programme/useful-information

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21. More info?

FAI Anti-Doping Manager : Mrs. Ségolène ROUILLON
+41 21 345 10 70 / This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Useful Information

You are a competitor and wish to know what "whereabouts" and "RTP" mean?

You are an event organizer and wish to know exactly how a doping control is conducted?

You are simply someone who wants to know more about the concept of doping and fight against doping?

Here is all the necessary information you need.

General concepts / At-a-glance leaflets

  • Want to know more about the general concept of doping? Click here.
  • Want to know more about what a TUE (Therapeutic use Exemption) is? Click here.
  • Want to know more about the concept of whereabouts? Click here.
  • Want to know how a doping control is conducted? Click here (and check video below).
  • Are you sure to be aware of the dangers of doping? If not, then click here.

These leaflets can be reproduced by FAI members and event organizers. If you wish to receive the production file (or simply a high resolution pdf version), please contact the This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

FAQ (created by the FAI and dedicated to air sports community)

Q&A (created bY WADA for athletes of all sports)

Games

  • Wanna play an interactive computer game that tests athletes’ knowledge about anti-doping? Play the Play True Quiz!
  • Wanna simulate real situation? Play the Play True Challenge! You will be presented with a series of conversations with your coach, teammates, doctor and many others and confronted with choices about doping and the consequences of your choices. The choices you make will have an impact on your ability to perform in the mini-game.

Videos

  • Wish to see how a doping control is conducted? Watch the dedicated video.

WADA Digital Library

The WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency) created this digital library in an effort to make its information and education tools more accessible for stakeholders. When visiting the library, you can choose your status (like athlete or coach) and find all the appropriate information for your type of audience.

 


CIMP Meeting Registration

IMPORTANT NOTE : if you are using Internet Explorer to fill in this form, please make sure to use the compatibility mode or you will not be able to submit the form.

 

Dear Delegates,
 
Please register online for the next Plenary Meeting of the FAI Medico-Physiological Commission (CIMP) to be held from Friday 27th to Sunday 29th June 2014 in Lausanne, Suisse, at the Maison du Sport International.

CIMP 2014 Meeting registration
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Accommodation

The suggested hotels are :

 

Hotel Aulac ***  within 5 minutes' walking distance of the meeting venue.

To book your hotel room, download the hotel booking form and send it directly to the Hotel Aulac.

 

Hotel du Port *** within 5 minutes' walking distance of the meeting venue

To book your hotel room, download the hotel booking form and send it directly to the Hotel du Port.

 

Further hotels to suit all needs


Visa Requirements

If you require an individual invitation for visa purposes, please contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , FAI Members Manager

Contact the FAI Therapeutic Use Exemption Panel

If you have a specific question regarding TUEs, you may use this form. All enquiries remain confidential.

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Projects

Description to come.

Meetings


FAI Medico-Physiological Commission Bureau

 
Jürgen Knüppel President
 
John L. Firth President of Honour United Kingdom
 
René Maire President of Honour Switzerland
 
Pedro Ortiz Garcia President of Honour Spain
 
R. Peter Saundby President of Honour United Kingdom
 
Martti Lepojärvi Vice-President
 
Marja Osinga - Meek Vice-President
 
Kazuhito Shimada Vice-President
 
Richard Thomas Garrison Secretary USA
 
Austria Delegate Bernhard Schober
 
Belgium Delegate Jacques Berlo
 
Chinese Taipei Delegate Elsa L.C. Mai
 
Croatia Delegate Mirko Ivkic
 
  Alternate Delegate Zoran Herljevic
 
Cyprus Delegate Phivos Christofides
 
Czech Rep. Delegate Oldrich Truska
 
  Alternate Delegate Jiri Sulc
 
Denmark Delegate Jens Elmeros
 
Egypt Delegate Atef Zaki
 
Finland Delegate Martti Lepojärvi
 
Former Yugoslav Rep. of Macedonia Delegate Krsto Kacev
 
France Delegate Thierry Villey
 
  Alternate Delegate Martine Royer
 
Germany Delegate Ralf Corleis
 
  Alternate Delegate Ernst J. Hollmann
 
Guatemala Delegate Julio Quevedo M.D.
 
Hungary Delegate Melles Imre
 
Iceland Delegate Samuel J. Samuelsson
 
Ireland Delegate Neil Johnston
 
Israel Delegate Moshe Porat
 
Italy Delegate Antonio Dal Monte
 
  Alternate Delegate Leone Dino Zingales
 
Japan Delegate Kazuhito Shimada
 
Korea Delegate Kwang-Youp Chung
 
Korea (People's Dem. Rep.) Delegate Hyo Nam Kang
 
  Alternate Delegate Chong II Kim
 
Lithuania Delegate Darius Ereminas
 
Malaysia Delegate (Dr.) Saravanam
 
  Alternate Delegate Sharifah Fetom
 
Mexico Delegate José Luis Cervantes Aguilar
 
  Alternate Delegate Luis Angel Amezcua González
 
Montenegro Delegate Nebojsa Juskovic
 
  Alternate Delegate Sasa Novovic
 
Netherlands Delegate Marja Osinga - Meek
 
  Alternate Delegate Paul Michel de Grood
 
New Zealand Delegate Claude Preitner
 
Portugal Delegate Mario Rodrigues Mendes
 
  Alternate Delegate António Manuel Gameiro Augusto Folgado
 
Russia Delegate Vladimir Zharov
 
  Alternate Delegate Galina Znamenskaya
 
Serbia Delegate Aleksandar Diklic
 
  Alternate Delegate Igor Koncar
 
Slovakia Delegate Peter Daxner
 
  Alternate Delegate Miroslav Pacuta
 
Sweden Delegate Henry Lindholm
 
Switzerland Delegate René Maire
 
Thailand Delegate Sutuspun Kajornboon
 
  Alternate Delegate Therapap Senawong
 
United Kingdom Delegate R. Peter Saundby
 
  Alternate Delegate David Bareford
 
USA Delegate Geoffrey W. McCarthy
 
  Alternate Delegate Richard Thomas Garrison